Are suffixes like Jr. and Sr. ever used to distinguish e.g. grandson and grandfather?

Are you JR if named after grandfather?

That common usage is to use Jr when the child is being named directly after his father and to use II when the child is to have the name of an earlier male relative, such as a grandfather, uncle, great-uncle, great-grandfather, etc. The Jr suffix has some other unofficial rules associated with it.

Can a junior be a grandson?

The Junior must be a son of the father, not a grandson. The names must be exactly the same, including the middle name. The father must still be living.

What does suffix SR mean?

senior

A man with the same name as his father uses “Jr.” after his name as long as his father is alive. His father may use the suffix “Sr.” for “senior.” The son may either drop the suffix after his father’s death or, if he prefers, retain it so that he won’t be confused with his late father.

What is generational suffix?

Generational suffixes are used to distinguish persons who share the same name within a family. A generational suffix can be used informally (for disambiguation purposes or as nicknames) and is often incorporated in legal documents.

Can your second son be a Jr?

Summary: Both are used to identify that the person is the second in the family to have the name. Jr is used when the son has the same name as the father. The second (II) is used when the elder family member is anyone other than the father.

Is SR part of a legal name?

Sr., Jr. etc. after a name are suffixes, not part of the legal name unless it was on their birth certificate or they legally changed their name to include it. You are verifying his name, not his status of Sr. or Jr.

Can a female be a Jr?

Although there are instances of daughters who are named after their mothers and thus use the suffix “Jr.” (such as Winifred Sackville Stoner, Jr., Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, Jr., and Carolina Herrera, Jr.) or after their grandmothers with the suffix “II”, this is not common.

Can a girl be named JR?

A daughter named after her mother is fairly unusual, and a daughter whose naming is proclaimed with the title “Junior” or “II” betokens a woman—perhaps two women—of unusual stature. Consider a few modern examples: 1. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Jr.

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